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The world today is home to more than 250 breeds of horses cultivated by man over many centuries. The Akhalteke breed stands apart as the patrarch of horse-breeding. It took more than three millenia to produce this breed. The exact date of the Ahalteke breed's first appearance is not known, but earliest mentions go back to the 4th-3rd century B.C. Bucephalus, the favourite horse of Alexander the Great, was Akhalteke.

Breeding secrets were passed down from father to son. The horse was their first friend and closest ally.
Modern Akhalteke horses inherited their ancestor's best traits.
The pride of Turkmens, Akhalteke horses are part of the sovereign Turkmenistan's national emblem.


Photo Collection

Akhal Teke

The Akhal-Teke is a horse from Turkmen, in the southern region of the modern country of Turkmenistan. These horses have been renowned as cavalry mounts and racehorses for some 3,000 years. The Akhal-Teke has superb natural gaits, and is the outstanding sporting horse from this area. The Akhal-Teke is native to an arid, barren environment. During its history, it has established a reputation of great stamina and courage. A key to the Akhal-Tekes stamina is its diet which is low in bulk but high in protein, and frequently includes butter and eggs mixed with barley. Today the Akhal-Teke is used in show jumping and dressage in addition to daily use under saddle.

Physical Description

The Akhal-Teke's conformation can be favorably compared to the Persian Arab, another breed of ancient origin. Its head is similar to the Arab's, being long and light with expressive eyes. It has relatively long ears and a long neck. It has a short silky mane, or none at all, and a short tail. This breed has a narrow chest, long back, and flat ribs. The legs are long and slender, clearly revealing the tendons. It averages 15-15.1 hands in height. It is often dun in color, although it can be bay and gray, with a pale golden coat preferred. The Akhal-Teke is among the most elegant of the world's horses.

Ancient Origins

The Akhal-Teke descended from the ancient Turkmenian horse which was one of the four original horse "types" that cross the Bering Strait from America in prehistoric times.. It was originally bred by tribes of Turkoman. The Akhal-Teke now is bred in the other provinces of the southern former U.S.S.R.

Records Set by Akhal-Teke Horses


In 1935, fifteen Akhal-Teke horses were required to travel from Ashkhabad to Moscow on a forced march, and traveled across the Kara-Kum desert, approximately 299 miles, without water.

 

The Akhal-Teke named "Absent" won the Prix de Dressage at the Rome Olympics in 1960.

Reference:

Kentucky Horse Park, 4089 Iron Works Pike, Lexington, KY 40511

Hendricks, Bonnie L., International Encyclopedia of Horse Breeds, Univ of Oklahoma Press, 1995

Photographs:

Kentucky Horse Park, Lexington, KY


The akhalteke is an ancient breed descended from one of the four horse types that crossed the Bering Strait from the Americas in prehistoric times. 
Approximately 10,000 years ago, as desertification took hold of Central Asia, the stocky horses indigenous to its steppe grasslands began to evolve into the lean and graceful but hardy horses that inhabit Turkmenistan today. As food and water became more scarce the heavy frame of the horse gave way to a lighter one. Longer necks, a higher head carriage, larger eyes and longer ears evolved to better the horses ability to see, smell, and hear predators over the increasingly open plains. The golden coloring predominant among the akhalteke provided the necessary camouflage against the desert landscape. Through natural selection a breed was created which would become the pride of Turkmenistan.

In appearance the akhalteke horse is similar to its descendent, the Persian Arab, though in size it is more comparable to another of its descendants, the English thoroughbred. The akhalteke has a small thin head, long ears and large eyes. It has a short silky mane or no mane at all, and a short tail. The Turkmen practice of covering their horses with two to three layers of felt blankets to protect against cold in the winter and flies in the summer encouraged a remarkably fine textured coat. Akhaltekes are known for their golden coloring but they can also be white, black, dappled, dun, bay, gray or chestnut colored. Fed a low bulk, high protein diet consisting of alfalfa and barely mixed with mutton fat, the akhalteke maintains its traditionally lean proportions of long sinewy legs, a narrow chest, a long back and flat ribs. The average height of an akhalteke is 15 to 15.1 hands. Its small hooves are unusually hard and are therefore rarely shod. The great speed, elasticity and grace of the akhalteke makes it at once a coveted racer, show jumper and dressage mount. Though spirited in temperament, akhaltekes are by all accounts gentle and loyal to their owners, yet aloof with strangers.

Turkmen tribesmen valued their horses above all else. As a nomadic group situated in a  rossroads of cultures they were often required to face enemy conflict and came to rely heavily on the strength, speed and endurance of their horses. The akhaltekes ability to  over great distances of harsh terrain under extreme climatic conditions, and to travel at night, made them indispensable to the Turkmen warriors. Aside from their valiant exertions as warriors mounts, akhaltekes were also invaluable in assisting Turkmen nomads with their daily work.

Prior to the Russian occupation of 1917, nearly every Turkmen family owned at least one or two horses. With Bolshevism however, came an end to private ownership and the horses were placed in state-owned stud farms. Rather than surrender their beloved horses to such a fate many tribesmen fled with them to Persia and Afghanistan. When it was then decreed that the horses in the stud farms were to be slaughtered for food, breeders released them into the desert, their natural habitat, thereby preventing what may have resulted in the annihilation of the akhalteke breed within the borders of Turkmenistan. In 1935, fifteen akhaltekes were ridden 3000 kilometers, from Ashgabat to Moscow, in eighty-four days, to demonstrate to Joseph Stalin their formidable strength in the hopes that he would grant his permission for their continued breeding. The campaign was a success.  Upon achieving independence in 1991, the government of Turkmenistan defined horse breeding as a nationalistic concern and an art form. The akhalteke has been declared a national treasure and its image graces the state seal of Turkmenistan. Today private ownership of akhaltekes in Turkmenistan is steadily increasing and there are now akhalteke farms in Germany and the United States.  Famous Akhaltekes: Absent Winner of the Prix de Dressage at the 1960 Olympics in Rome. In 1968 Absent was named the Worlds Best Sporting Horse. Dancing Brave Winner of the 1986 Arc de Triomphe Race. Dancing Brave holds the record for the highest price ever paid for a horse; US$50 million. Melekush In 1956 Nikita Krushchev presented Melekush to Queen Elizabeth II of England. He was described by the Royal Equerry as Britains best horse. Buccephalus The famed favorite horse of Alexander the Great.


Gemiini bin yllyklardan alan Ahal-teke atlaryna "kudratly alem atlary", "Behit atlary", " Cennet atlary" atlary verilmi. Trkmenler kendi atlary olan ahal-teke atlarynyn tohumlaryny temiz saklamayy ve korumayy bu gne kadar srdrmler.Alimlerin u zamanki ilmi aratyrmalarynda dnyada hesaba alynmy 250 at tohumlaryndan en byk gemie sahibi Ahal Teke tohumudur. Bu atlary br tohumlary almakda geni kullanylanydyr. Yani bir ok atlaryn atasydyr. Bedev atlar Trkmenin sungatydyr. (Tarihi belgeselden)



The akhalteke is an ancient breed descended from one of the four horse types that crossed the Bering Strait from the Americas in prehistoric times. 

Approximately 10,000 years ago, as desertification took hold of Central Asia,
the stocky horses indigenous to its steppe grasslands began to evolve into the lean and graceful but hardy horses that inhabit Turkmenistan today. As food and water became more scarce the heavy frame of the horse gave way to a lighter one. Longer necks, a higher head carriage, larger eyes and longer ears evolved to better the horses ability to see, smell, and hear predators over the increasingly open plains. The golden coloring predominant among the akhalteke provided the necessary camouflage against the desert landscape. Through natural selection a breed was created which would become the pride of Turkmenistan.

In appearance the akhalteke horse is similar to its descendent, the Persian
Arab, though in size it is more comparable to another of its descendants,
the English thoroughbred. The akhalteke has a small thin head, long ears
and large eyes. It has a short silky mane or no mane at all, and a short
tail. The Turkmen practice of covering their horses with two to three
layers of felt blankets to protect against cold in the winter and flies in the
summer encouraged a remarkably fine textured coat. Akhaltekes are
known for their golden coloring but they can also be white, black,
dappled, dun, bay, gray or chestnut colored. Fed a low bulk, high protein
diet consisting of alfalfa and barely mixed with mutton fat, the akhalteke
maintains its traditionally lean proportions of long sinewy legs, a narrow
chest, a long back and flat ribs. The average height of an akhalteke is 15
to 15.1 hands. Its small hooves are unusually hard and are therefore rarely shod. The great speed, elasticity and grace of the akhalteke makes it at once a coveted racer, show jumper and dressage mount. Though spirited in temperament, akhaltekes are by all accounts gentle and loyal to their owners, yet aloof with strangers.

Turkmen tribesmen valued their horses above all else. As a nomadic
group situated in a crossroads of cultures they were often required to face
enemy conflict and came to rely heavily on the strength, speed and
endurance of their horses. The akhaltekes ability to cover great distances
of harsh terrain under extreme climatic conditions, and to travel at night,
made them indispensable to the Turkmen warriors. Aside from their
valiant exertions as warriors mounts, akhaltekes were also invaluable in
assisting Turkmen nomads with their daily work.


Prior to the Russian occupation of 1917, nearly every Turkmen family
owned at least one or two horses. With Bolshevism however, came an
end to private ownership and the horses were placed in state-owned stud
farms. Rather than surrender their beloved horses to such a fate many
tribesmen fled with them to Persia and Afghanistan. When it was then
decreed that the horses in the stud farms were to be slaughtered for food,
breeders released them into the desert, their natural habitat, thereby
preventing what may have resulted in the annihilation of the akhalteke
breed within the borders of Turkmenistan. In 1935, fifteen akhaltekes
were ridden 3000 kilometers, from Ashgabat to Moscow, in eighty-four
days, to demonstrate to Joseph Stalin their formidable strength in the
hopes that he would grant his permission for their continued breeding. The campaign was a success.

Upon achieving independence in 1991, the government of Turkmenistan
defined horse breeding as a nationalistic concern and an art form. The
akhalteke has been declared a national treasure and its image graces the
state seal of Turkmenistan. Today private ownership of akhaltekes in
Turkmenistan is steadily increasing and there are now akhalteke farms in
Germany and the United States.


Famous Akhaltekes:
Absent
Winner of the Prix de Dressage at the 1960 Olympics in Rome. In 1968
Absent was named the Worlds Best Sporting Horse.
Dancing Brave
Winner of the 1986 Arc de Triomphe Race. Dancing Brave holds the
record for the highest price ever paid for a horse; US$50 million.
Melekush
In 1956 Nikita Krushchev presented Melekush to Queen Elizabeth II of
England. He was described by the Royal Equerry as Britains best
horse.
Buccephalus
The famed favorite horse of Alexander the Great.




AZAD & NAZAR & RUSLAN
ODEKOV'S HORSES

For more information mail to: mailto:allaguli@turkmens.net
 
 

  1998 ..
Bagira 1998

  1998 ..
Daugawa 1998

  1998 ..
Goresh 1998

  1995 ..
Parahat 1995

  1998 ..
Pegas 1998

 

The most historical racing horses are ahalteke horses

You want to have one?
For more information mail to: mailto:allaguli@turkmens.net
 
 

  96 ..
Arzuw 1996

  97 ..
Garagyz 1997

  96 ..
Gulgun 1996

  97 ..
Shadimsh 1997

  98 ..
Sanjar 1998

  1998 ..
Sapaly 1998

  1998 ..
Shirhan 1998

  1998 ..
Sirhan 1998

For more information mail to: mailto:allaguli@turkmens.net


Introduction to the Turkmen Horse in Iran

 

Ali Golshan has contributed greatly to our knowledge of the Turkoman horse with his book, Introduction to the Turkmen Horse in Iran . Although the breed is more widely known as the Akhal Teke from Turkmenistan, its Persian counterpart has played an equal role in the development of all light breeds of horses in the world. Until the Russian conquest of Turkmenistan in the early 20th century Turkoman tribes roamed freely from the Alborz mountain range, over the Atrek river and through the Kopet Dagh mountains to the great sand desert. The major tribes of Goklan, Yamoud and Teke proudly bred their own strains, basically keeping them seperate.

 

Today the Akhal Teke is primarily an amalgam of the different strains. Their Persian counterparts continued to be bred in the tribal manner and are still identifiable as individual strains although invariably mixing amongst the strains has occurred.

 

This horse is gradually regaining recognition in the world as DNA analysis has shown its blood runs in all our modern breeds of light horse. The genetic contribution is immense; its history romantic; its form and action flowing and beautiful and the people who raise them still live as they did 2000 years ago.

 

Mr. Golshan's book follows long forgotten trails, describes traditional methods of breeding, training and racing and leaves the reader with a sense of having lived history. It is beautifully illustrated with color and black and white photos from the early past to the present. It has been published in a limited edition of 2000 copies so that anyone wishing to include this invaluable contribution to our knowledge of the horse should not hesitate to take advantage of this opportunity.

 

Louise Firouz

Ghara Tepe Sheikh

November, 2005

 

Cover

Ali%20golshan%20&%20Louise%20Firouz

Introduction to the Turkmen Horse in Iran
Author: Ali Golshan
Translator: Sam Rajabi
Publisher: Pejvake keyvan
First Edition: 2005
ISBN: 964-8797-08-2
Price: $ 20
The book contains the following topics:
- Preface
- A History of the Turkmen Horse
-  Introduction to the Turkmen Horse and Its Strains
- The Horse in the Turkmen Culture
- Keeping and Breeding Horses in the Turkmen Desert
- Horse Racing
- The Strengths of the Turkmen Horse in Sports
- Review of the Turkmen Horses' Conditions in Iran
- Turkmen Horse Standards
- Bibliography
The said book shall be available in Farsi and English, containing 199 pages, accompanied by a lot of colour images of existing Turkmen horses in Iran.
How to buy this Book
You can purchase the book in the following way:
Deposit the retail price ($ 20, including packing handling and postage) in:
Bank Meli Iran, Kashef Branch,
Code number 1551,
account number 4400926.
Ali Golshan
Tehran/Iran
Please send the receipt of the payment along with your accurate
address to the address in our website.
Email address: persianhorses@gmail.com
Immediately upon the receipt of your payment the book shall be mailed
to your postal address


 

Cover BOOK EnglishThe Gold Mustang magazine, leading informational&analytical equestrian magazine in Russia, offers to Your attention a new unique project elite edition of the book Golden collection of Akhal-Teke horses on two languages. The Golden Mustang offers to purchase the unique book-photo album about Akhal-teke horses. Our book is the only edition in Russia about the most ancient breed of horses. For the first time in one book is combined description of the most famous Akhal-teke bloodlines and is represented the selection work of the main stud farms of our country, who are occupied with breeding of the divine argamaks. The photo album is printed with taking into account modern and high-quality polygraphic technologies. Together with informational advertisements catalogue includes series of professional articles concerning peculiarities of genetic aspects of the ancient Akhal-Teke breed.

 

In Golden collection is described more than 80% of brood stock of the Akhal-Teke breed, focused in Russia and Kazakhstan. Full translation on English language. For details visit our web site www.goldmustang.ru or write on our email gmfoto@mail.ru, mustang_golden@yahoo.com

You can order our production over the phones: +7(495)9452478, 9452212 or write on our email. Price: 99 Euro (with delivery).

 

Format: 285*285 sm

Volume: 196 pages

Edition: 5000 copies

Publisher: Gold Mustangmagazine

 


Dr. Ghiadi:

I had come to leave, but I got stuck

Dr. Ghiadi, the President of the Equestrian Commission of the Province of North Khorasan, explained the state of horse riding in that province to our reporter: Across North Khorasan,

there is a treasure of vegetation variety and living habitats.

Here, there are regions such as the town of Maneh and Somlaqan in which there exist a lot of thoroughbred horses. In the regions of Gholaman, Dehestan-Raz, Bojnord and some parts of Asfrain-Shirvan and recently in the region of Faurouje and Judgeroom there have been

some tendencies to expand and organize the horse industry.

This region is full of wonders. If you travel for half an hour, you will pass through jungles, snow and deserts.he said. These latent natural conditions have a lot of potentials to fulfill our national interests but unfortunately much negligence has taken place in the past years. said Dr. Ghiadi.Now, the horses are being dragged from the free countryside to the cities;

this is, of course, a good phenomenon in essence, but the danger I feel is that the incomplete and substandard boxes are going to eradicate these horses. The deficient foals cannot be distinguished in boxes. Of course, now the scientific systems in place in Tehran

are not bad, but in general the possibility exists that the deficient foals enter the system of breed improvement and create problems.I entered the world of horses and riding very easily. It was easy to enter but to stay and continue was very difficult. said Dr. Ghiadi. This is the world of hard working and different types of people; I like this atmosphere. When I first came to Jarglan as a doctor, I was thinking: I have come and I will leave, but I got stuck.

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Documents
 

  


ahalteke_k

Chary Shirliev
 The Divine Akhalteke Horse



Perfectly  illustrated book -  a picture album about Turkmen  horses    sweaty of blood . For the first time, to attention   of readers it is given together 350 breeds of horses of all world. Here You can get acquainted  with well known  horses of the world, outstanding records to receive the information on ancestors of all Akhalteke lines, to begin involuntary participants of well-known horse run Ashgabat-Moscow 1935 and 1988. A plenty of illustrations, many of which are published for the first time make work especially valuable and unique. The book is addressed to experts in breeding horses, and also for  a wide range of readers.

Turkmenistan/Ashgabat mkr.Mir 2/1, 23 blok "B"
Tel/Fax: 8-10-99-312-45-39-25
keletdag@mail.ru

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